An end to mandatory parking spots at new Ville-Marie housing developments

Bylaw requiring real estate developers to build minimum number of parking spots to be nixed

Mayor Valérie Plante said she wants to amend the bylaw so that parking spots are no longer mandatory at new residential buildings in the Ville-Marie borough. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press)


Condo developers will no longer be required to build a minimum number of parking spots at new housing projects in Ville-Marie, as the Montreal borough plans to change that requirement today.

A city bylaw currently forces residential developers to build a number of parking spots that’s proportional to the number of housing units, among other factors.

If that number is not met, they have to pay a fine of $80,000 for each missing parking spot.

Mayor Valérie Plante said the bylaw is outdated and that several developers have pleaded with the city to make exceptions. 

She wants to amend the regulation so that parking spots are no longer mandatory at new residential buildings.

The Ville-Marie borough — which includes the city’s downtown core, and runs east-west from the railway tracks a few streets east of Frontenac Street to Atwater Avenue — is expected to vote on the measure at its meeting Tuesday.

“I heard you, you believed this bylaw was a bit passé. So we’re getting rid of it,” said Plante, speaking at an event hosted by the Urban Development Institute of Quebec, a commercial real estate lobby group, on Monday.

She said a required minimum number of bike racks will remain in place, though. 

“We want to give developers the flexibility to decide, depending on the target population and the distance from public transit, whether it is really necessary to build parking spaces,” Plante said. 

The group’s CEO, former Parti Québécois leader André Boisclair, said he welcomed the planned change.

“This is a good thing, especially since households and young households in particular, behave differently than those of their elders,” he said.

More affordable housing units

While builders in Ville-Marie will no longer have to dig out space for parking, they soon will have to include affordable housing units in their plans.

Plante said the city has one year to draft the bylaw that will make the affordable units mandatory, and it plans to hold consultations through the city’s public consultation office (OCPM).

Plante says the city is also working on a bylaw that would require large real estate projects to include a certain number of affordable housing units. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press)


The new rules, which were one of Plante’s election campaign promises, are expected to come into effect in July 2019.

Developers want to see the bylaw as soon as possible to see how it would affect future projects, Plante said, and the city is calculating the financial impact they might incur.

“We want to be reassuring — we’re working collegially with the different stakeholders,” she said.

The City of Montreal’s metropolis status, secured by former mayor Denis Coderre, grants it the power to make it necessary to have a minimum number of affordable housing units in large real estate projects.


CBC News · 

With files from Radio-Canada