Canadian commercial investment should begin looking further

Would-be investors in Canadian commercial real estate should begin considering markets beyond the usual hotspots of Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver if recent trends south of the border are any indication.

The tech industry’s sustained hunger for Canadian offices is gradually depleting available urban office space. The examples set by some U.S. cities might provide a good answer to this quandary, according to the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA).

“Something like a Charlotte, or a Kansas City, or an Austin,” CompTIA senior vice-president of research and market intelligence Tim Herbert told Postmedia in an interview.

“These cities [are] more affordable, [and] in some cases you can make an argument that there is a better quality of life.”

In its Cyberprovinces 2019 study, CompTIA noted that smaller cities can become more feasible investment options in the very near future. Last year alone, Canadian tech employment expanded by 61,000 new jobs, amounting to a 3.8% annual increase.

Overall, the tech workforce grew by as much as 249,000 new employees since 2010.

Herbert added that demand for Canada’s office spaces is “not just limited to technology companies, who are starting to take office space or build new headquarters, but a range of different company types are attracting tech talent.”

Data from Avison Young showed that the Canadian office market has seen the positive absorption of 9 million square feet (MSF) in the year ending June 30, 2019. This has massively outstripped the nearly 6 MSF absorption during the immediately preceding 12-month period.

The sustained popularity of the industry and the resulting demand upon Canada’s commercial real estate is impelled by the strength of its long-term employment prospects. In 2018, tech earnings clocked in an average of $78,070 – fully 51% higher than the average reading of $51,794 in the private sector.

Are you looking to invest in property? If you like, we can get one of our mortgage experts to tell you exactly how much you can afford to borrow, which is the best mortgage for you or how much they could save you right now if you have an existing mortgage.

 

 

by Ephraim Vecina | 24 Oct 2019

Why CRE investors should consider niche assets

Investors in commercial real estate should consider more than the mainstream asset classes and go niche.

That’s the takeaway from a new report from global real estate firm Cushman & Wakefield that highlights the benefits of investing in niche assets.

These assets include cold storage, data centers, medical offices, student housing, and senior housing.

The report says that transactions in niche assets have exploded in recent years and are now similar to retail and industrial. And changes in how we live and the aging population is set to drive volumes higher.

Niche assets have also outperformed the overall CRE benchmark in the two most recent recessions, suggesting that this could provide defensive exposure in future downturns.

Investors also gain exposure to secular drivers such as changes in demographics, affordable housing challenges, technology, and consumer behavior.

Complex operations
The report notes that institutional activity in niche assets could have room to expand from its current uneven pattern, which would “support pricing and liquidity in a virtuous cycle.”

However, it’s suggested that investors might be better buying an experienced operator in a niche or partnering with one, as niche asset strategies are “often operationally complex.”

By Steve Randall | last updated on the 22 Oct 2019

CMHC FINANCING

Toronto needs to double rental supply to meet future demand

A new report from RBC Economics focuses on the rental housing deficit which is set to intensify in the coming years, especially in Toronto and Vancouver.

The report says that supply of new rental homes will need to pick up pace to meet future demand; in Toronto the pace must double. In the meantime, lack of supply is leading to “uncomfortable highs” for rents – which means those hoping to save up to buy a home are squeezed even further while high home prices have “crushed some homeownership dreams.”

RBC says that big cities must increase rental supply to have any hope of tackling affordability issues.

It notes that there are some positive signs in some cities, such as Montreal and Vancouver where has new waves of supply underway; and in Calgary where there are elevated rental vacancies.

But in Toronto, the report says supply will not come close to demand in the coming years and calls for specific targets and incentives to address the issue.

Deficit needs action
RBC Economics’ estimates of the supply needed to balance out supply and demand in the major markets as of late 2018 are: a deficit of 9,100 rental units in Toronto, Montreal had a 6,800-unit deficit and Vancouver 3,800 units.  Calgary carried a small surplus of 300 units.

This will be exacerbated by the estimated increase in renter-households of 22,000 in Toronto and 9,400 in Vancouver over the medium term, with Montreal averaging 8,200 per year on average.

The report estimates that Toronto will need 28,600 new rental units on average over a two year timeframe with 11,600 in Montreal, 11,300 in Vancouver and 4,150 in Calgary.

Are you looking to invest in property? If you like, we can get one of our mortgage experts to tell you exactly how much you can afford to borrow, which is the best mortgage for you or how much they could save you right now if you have an existing mortgage.

By Steve Randall |  last updated on the 26 Sep 2019

 

Seven-building acquisition attests to Montreal’s rental strength

Late last week, Greybrook Realty Partners and Marlin Spring announced the acquisition of a Montreal portfolio comprised of seven apartment buildings with a total of 324 rental units.

Said properties are situated close to restaurants, shops, hospitals, grocery stores, two metro stations, the Université de Montréal, and hospitals like the Jewish General Hospital.

Greybrook Realty and Marlin Spring stated that they will also be in charge of renovating suites and improving the common areas across all the buildings.

“The close of this acquisition brings the total number of units within our value-add portfolio to 774. With asking rents currently below comparable products in the area, we believe an opportunity exists to improve both the product offering and revenue through execution of a value-add program,” Greybrook Realty executive director Jared Berlin said.

“With the success of our existing Montreal portfolio, supported by the City of Montreal’s strong rental market fundamentals, we believe these assets are a natural fit in our growing Quebec Multi-family Portfolio” Marlin Spring CFO Elliot Kazarnovsky added.

In recent years, strong population growth – especially immigration – has spurred sustained growth in Montreal’s rental housing market.

Figures from IPA’s Midyear Canadian Multifamily Investment Forecast Report indicated that by the end of June 2019, the city’s average rent increased 4.1% year-over-year, up to $797 per month. Average prices grew by 6% year-over-year, up to $154,400 per unit.

 

by Ephraim Vecina | 23 Sep 2019

Lesser known available CMHC options for Apartment Building Owners

CMHC stands for the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, which is a crown corporation of the government of Canada. Although apartment owners are usually familiar with the benefits of CMHC loan insurance and CMHC loan terms, there are many other CMHC financing options that are not well known and may be beneficial to apartment owners.
CMHC and Commercial Property
CMHC does not directly insure loans for commercial property such as office building or retail centers. However, CMHC does permit up to 30% of a multi-residential property to be used for commercial uses such as a gift shop, office space, etc. If the area of the commercial space is less than 30% of gross floor area or lesser than 30% of the total lending value, then the revenue generated from that commercial space can be included into the total revenue of the property. However, if the commercial space is greater than 30% of the total property area, then the income cannot be added to the total revenue of the property.
CMHC Top-up
Apartment owners may want to increase their loan amount at a minimal cost. The CMHC permits existing CMHC insured loans to be refinanced up to a 65% loan to property value ratio with a premium of 1.75% that is paid only on the new money.
CMHC Mortgage Financing
CMHC will insure second mortgages until the term renewal of the existing first mortgage, which doesn’t necessarily have to be a CMHC insured loan. Then, at term renewal, the two mortgages are combined into one new CMHC. This is beneficial in a rising interest rate environment because a CMHC insured the second mortgage provides a way to increase the loan amount during an existing loan term rather than waiting for the maturity of the first mortgage.
CMHC also insures loans for capital improvements to a maximum of 85% of property value.
CMHC also permits floating rate term loans for terms of at least 5 years. These situations would be beneficial when rates are decreasing or early repayment is anticipated.
Overall, many CMHC financing options are overlooked and not understood very well by apartment investors, so it is important to learn all of the different options available and see which ones can be beneficial.
By: Daniela Peeva |  June 2019

Rental Market in Canada – Fall 2018

A Falling Vacancy Rate

Once per year, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation provides a comprehensive review of rental markets across Canada. The survey occurs during the first half of October. Results for this year were released on November 28.

For October 2018, the vacancy rate was 2.4%, which was a substantial drop from the 3.0% rate recorded a year earlier. The vacancy rate for 2018 is far below the average of 3.3% for the entire period shown in this chart. The reduction in vacancies resulted in more rapid rent increases, at 3.5% this year. Over the entire period shown, the average increase was 2.6%. This data shows that the situation has become increasingly challenging for Canada’s tenants.

 

 

Vacancy rates fell in 7 of the 10 provinces. Manitoba, BC, and Ontario saw small increases in their vacancy rates. These three provinces also saw the most rapid rent increases. The lowest vacancy rate is now in PEI, followed by BC and Ontario. The highest vacancy rates are in the three provinces where economies have been hurt by the plunge in oil prices (Saskatchewan, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Alberta). These provinces saw the weakest rent increases.

 

Interpretation

Since the data is collected only once per year, it is difficult to construct any models for analysis or forecasting of rental markets. The author’s experimentation over many years, for many different communities across Canada, has resulted in statistical models that have low “reliability”. But, those low-reliability results have been surprisingly consistent, and have led to a conclusion: the two most important drivers of changes for the vacancy rate are job creation during the past year (which allows more people to buy or rent housing) and total completions of housing during the past year.It is tempting to expect that completions of new-rental apartments would be important, but the author’s analysis has found that this is rarely the case.

On reflection, this makes sense:

  • The rental market is part of a complex housing system in which there are very large flows between ownership and renting, and between different forms of housing.
  • Expansion of the total stock of housing offers people more choice: even when people move into new home ownership dwellings, that move sets of a chain of other moves. Much of the time, that chain of moves includes someone moving out of a rental, which creates an opportunity for a new tenant.
  • Moreover, the tenure on a new dwelling is not fixed for all time. In particular, it is well known that many new condominium apartments are occupied as rentals. In addition, some low-rise dwellings (single-detached, semi-detached, and town homes) are ostensibly built for ownership but are made available as rentals.

It is also tempting to expect that changes in resale market activity will affect the rental market. But, once again while the statistical analysis produces unreliable results, over many repetitions it has been found that resale activity has little effect on vacancy rates. This also makes sense on reflection. Most of the time a resale transaction does not add to total demand for housing (the buyer usually moves out of a different dwelling) and it usually does not alter the total supply of housing (unless the new buyer adds or removes a basement apartment).

Employment Trends

Our impressions about the employment situation are largely based on data from Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey (“LFS”). This data indicates that during the year up to this September, employment in Canada expanded by 1.2%. This is slower than the rate of population growth (1.3%), and this therefore should be considered a mediocre result. Based on this data, we would expect that housing demand would be weak, and the drop in the vacancy rate this year would be a surprise.

However, the data from the LFS is derived from a sample survey and like all such surveys, it can produce errors. Statistics Canada has a second survey (Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours, or “SEPH”), which is based on data from employers, and is therefore likely to produce more-accurate data. This data receives much less attention because it is published almost two months after the LFS (the most recent data is for August). The two datasets usually tell similar stories. At present, however, SEPH shows growth of 1.8% (as of August) versus the 1.2% shown by the LFS (as of September).

Over the entire period shown in this chart, job growth averaged 1.5% per year. Strong job growth in both 2017 and 2018 helps to explain the drops in the vacancy rates that were seen in both years. Housing completions were at above average levels during 2017 and 2018 (the chart shows the figures for 12 month periods ending in September). These elevated volumes of new housing supply provided some relief for rental markets. Without this additional housing supply, the drops in the vacancy rates in 2017 and 2018 would have been even larger than they were.

 

Looking Forward

The mortgage stress tests have resulted in reduced buying of new and existing homes. It takes some time for changes in purchases of new homes to translate in reduced housing starts (and even longer for housing completions to be affected). Increasingly, it appears that housing starts have peaked, and may have started to fall. The next chart illustrates that total housing starts were very strong during 2016 and 2017, but the trend has started to fall during 2018. A more detailed examination would show that housing starts have turned sharply for low-rise dwellings (single-detached, semi-detached, and town homes) but remain very strong for apartments. During 2019, starts for apartments will gradually reflect the reductions in sales that have occurred this year. This is explored in more detailed within the Housing Market Digest reports (for Canada and the regions) that can be found here: https://goo.gl/kJ6mcC

Following from these trends for housing starts, housing completions are expected to fall only slightly during the coming year, meaning that new housing supply will continue to provide some relief for the rental sector. However, housing completions are expected to fall considerably during 2020. As for employment, higher interest rates can be expected to gradually weigh on job creation during 2019 and 2020.

For 2019, a combination of continued high levels of housing completions and a slowdown of job creation should mean that there will be little change in the apartment vacancy rate (perhaps a drop to 2.3% from the 2.4% seen in 2018). The low vacancy rate can be expected to result in continued rapid rent increases, at a rate of at least 3%.

During 2020, the reduction of housing completions that will result from the mortgage stress tests will add to pressures in the rental sector. For 2020, the vacancy rate is expected to drop further (approaching 2.0%) and rent increases will quicken.

Government Policies at Cross Purposes

The federal government has announced plans to make major expenditures in support of affordable housing ($40 billion over 10 years). The federally-mandated mortgage stress tests, by reducing movements out of renting, will add to pressures within rental housing markets, and are operating at cross-purposes to the National Housing Strategy.

 

 

 

Disclaimer of Liability

This report has been compiled using data and sources that are believed to be reliable. Mortgage Professionals Canada Inc.
accepts no responsibility for any data or conclusions contained herein. Completed by Will Dunning, November 28, 2018.
Copyright: Mortgage Professionals Canada 2018

Why use Mortgage alliance Commercial

Top 5 Reasons to Use Mortgage Alliance Commercial Canada (MACC)

 

  1. MACC is Licensed across Canada with offices in Quebec, Ontario, Alberta, and BC
  2. MACC has maintained privileged relationships with all major lenders across the country to allow our clients to access better terms and conditions for their financing needs
  3. MACC simplifies and manage the entire process of any lending transaction from pre-screening requirements and options; completing loan underwriting and lender negotiations, through to the disbursement requirements, to ensure successful completion and funding.
  4. MACC is an approved CMHC correspondent and experienced in preparing and presenting applications directly to CMHC for underwriting and approval. This provides access to preferred rates and terms, and higher loan to value ratios. This includes multi-unit rentals, mixed-use, purchases and refinances. We pre-screen deals to determine potential loan amount available based on property information provided such as rent roll, and statement of income and expenses.
  5. MACC has over 20 years’ experience in the commercial broker industry and a significant track record in deal success covering all commercial industries. We are well-positioned to guide clients through the most complex transactions and obtain the best options in the market. See our website for just a few of the projects completed.  http://macommercial.ca/projects/

 

 

 

Marion Cook  | November 2018

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Commercial Mortgage Commentary – CMLS Mortgage Analytics Group

Making News

Overnight Rate
In late October, the Bank of Canada (“BOC”) announced the third 25 bps rate hike this year, which brought the overnight target rate to 1.75%. The increase comes after continued strength in economic figures and the negotiation of the “new NAFTA” trade deal with Mexico and the U.S. This pushed the prime rate of major Canadian banks to 3.95%.


GOC Yields
Spread premiums between the Government of Canada (“GOC”) 3, 5, and 10-year term bond yields remain extremely tight. Through Q3/18, the premium between 3-year and 10-year tightened by 4 bps, while the premium between 5-year and 10-year remained unchanged.

Investments
In Q3/18, Telus sold its Vancouver headquarters, Telus Garden, to a partnership of investors represented by Regina-based Greystone Managed Investments for an undisclosed amount. The property was built as a joint-venture by Telus and Westbank Corp. for $750 million and consists of an office tower and residential building in Downtown Vancouver. Telus is expected to generate approximately $170 million in profit on the sale.


Commercial Mortgages

Lenders and borrowers have maintained balanced supply and demand for the 5th straight month with commercial mortgage spreads staying flat. 5-year deals are pricing 145 bps to 160 bps over GOC bonds for top quality assets, while 10-year spreads are pricing at a 10 bps premium for similar risk. The liquidity premium of commercial mortgage spreads over BBBrated corporate bonds remained generally unchanged since our last report with the premium down slightly from 64 bps to 62 bps as a result of a slight increase in corporate spreads. This moves the liquidity premium away from the long-term average of 70 bps.


CMBS

The CMBS market continues to be challenged by unattractive profitability due to tightening commercial mortgage spreads relative to CMBS bonds. Recent weighted average breakeven mortgage spread for new CMBS issuance was approximately 225 bps and with current spreads around 190 bps, the prospects of profitability falls short by 35 bps. Until the commercial mortgage spreads move past the CMBS breakeven point, new issuance activity is expected to be thin.

Senior Unsecured Debt

In Q3/18, senior unsecured debt issuance slowed to $625 million, down from $1.65 billion in Q2/18. However, cumulative 2018 issuance is up 27% on a YTD basis and makes up 86% of the total issuance in 2017. Since our last report, Crombie REIT issued a $75 million, 2.9- year note with a 170 bps spread. Overall, spreads on BBB-rated unsecured debt decreased through Q3/18 to 145 bps. For now, spreads on unsecured REIT debt continue to receive cheaper investor dollars compared to conventional commercial mortgages with a difference of only 10 bps at the end of Q3/18.

CMHC

Spreads on multi-family CMHC-insured loans remained stable since our last report with spreads ranging between 80 bps and 105 bps over GOC on 5-year terms and between 85 bps and 110 bps over GOC on 10-year terms. This is partly due to the relatively unchanged spreads on CMHC-backed Canada Mortgage Bonds (“CMB”). 5-year CMB spreads only decreased 3 bps to 28 bps and the 10-year CMB spreads remained flat between July and September.


High Yield

In Q3/18 the British Columbia Securities Commission (BCSC) announced it will not be renewing the exemption that previously allowed Mortgage Investment Corporations (MICs) to operate in BC without engaging in the onerous registration process with the BCSC. The impact of this announcement will be felt in the local industry as many small MICs will now have to endure registration costs.

ABOUT CMLS MORTGAGE ANALYTICS GROUP
The CMLS Mortgage Analytics Group (“MAG”) is a division of CMLS and the leading provider of independent mortgage valuation, risk ratings, market research and software to the commercial mortgage industry in Canada. Our clients include some of the largest institutional asset managers and insurance companies with assets under management ranging from single digit billions to over $100 billion.

STANDARD RENTAL HOUSING MULTI-UNIT

Mortgage Loan Insurance for Multi-Unit Residential Properties

AT-A-GLANCE

CMHC mortgage loan insurance enables Approved Lenders to offer greater financing choices to borrowers providing standard rental housing accommodations in multi-unit residential buildings.


LOAN PURPOSE
Construction financing, purchase or refinance.

PROPERTY TYPE AND SIZE
● Projects providing standard rental housing
(self-contained units).
● Minimum project size of 5 units.

NON-RESIDENTIAL COMPONENT
Not to exceed 30% of gross floor area nor 30% of total lending value. Loan relating to non-residential component must not exceed 75% of lending value of non-residential component.

MAXIMUM LOAN-TO-VALUE RATIO
Construction financing: up to 85% of lending value as determined by CMHC or 100% of cost, whichever amount is less.
Purchase: up to 85% of the purchase price or lending value as determined by CMHC, whichever amount is less.
Refinance: up to 85% of the lending value as determined by CMHC.
Purchase/Refinance with improvements: up to 85% of the ‘as is’ or ‘as improved’ lending value, as determined by CMHC.

Is your multi-unit project eligible for affordable housing flexibilities or an energy-efficient housing premium refund? Check out the Affordable Housing and Energy-Efficient Properties information sheets for helpful information.

LOAN ADVANCING
Construction financing: During construction the loan can be advanced up to 75% of costs or lending value, whichever is less. The advancing of additional funds is subject to rental achievement.
● Construction costs are to be reviewed and recommended by a quantity cost surveyor (flexibility may be provided in small markets).
● Construction must be completed under a fixed price contract with a general contractor or under a construction management arrangement.
● First and last advances must be approved by CMHC. The lender has the option to approve advances occurring between the first and last.
Purchase or refinance of existing properties with improvements:
● Where rental income is not disrupted during construction, the loan advances will be limited to the greater of 75% of the “as improved” value or 85% of the “as is” value.
● Where rental income is disrupted, the maximum advance allowed during construction is based on 75% of the “as improved” value. The advancing of additional funds is subject to rental achievement.

RENTAL ACHIEVEMENT
Where loan advances are required above 75% level, authorization to advance will be given by CMHC once the Approved Lender has provided evidence acceptable to CMHC, that the property has achieved the projected rent level.

MINIMUM DEBT COVERAGE RATIO REQUIREMENTS

INTEREST RATE
Fixed interest rate or floating (with ceiling rate).

AMORTIZATION
CMHC may consider amortization periods of up to 40 years. A premium surcharge applies for amortization periods greater than 25 years. The amortization period must not exceed the remaining economic life of the property, as determined by CMHC.

SECURITY TYPE
First, second and pari passu mortgages are permitted.
Second mortgages are permitted as an interim measure.

GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR BORROWER ELIGIBILITY
The borrower must demonstrate competence and experience commensurate with the size and type of property for which mortgage loan insurance is being sought. The borrower or a corporation affiliated with the borrower must have at least five years of demonstrated management experience in the operation and management of similar multi-unit residential properties. Alternatively, a formal property management contract must be in place with a professional third party property management firm.

BORROWER NET WORTH
The borrower must have minimum net worth equal to at least 25% of the loan amount being requested, with a minimum of $100,000.

GUARANTEE REQUIREMENTS
Construction financing: The borrower and guarantor must provide their covenant/guarantee for 100% of the outstanding amount owing under the housing loan from time to time until stabilized rents have been achieved for 12 consecutive months, at which time the additional guarantee required may be reduced to 40% of the outstanding loan amount owing under the mortgage, from time to time.
Purchase or refinance of existing properties: For new loans on existing residential rental properties, the guarantee amount required by CMHC is 40% of the outstanding loan amount owing under the mortgage, from time to time.
Limited recourse: Where a loan does not exceed 65% of lending value, as determined by CMHC, Approved Lenders may request that the loan be considered non-recourse to the borrower. The recourse of the Approved Lender shall be limited to the property and the other assets taken as security and not personally against the borrower.
CMHC may require additional risk mitigation measures as it deems appropriate (e.g. equity retention, replacement reserves, collateral security, personal guarantees).

CMHC mortgage loan insurance provides access to preferred interest rates lowering borrowing costs for the construction, purchase and refinance of multi-unit residential properties and facilitates renewals throughout the life of the mortgage.