Posts

New $100-million fund announced for investment in first mortgages in Ontario

Toronto-based real estate investment firm Downing Street has announced the launch of its $100 million private placement offering, which will be investing in first mortgages in multiple urban locations across Ontario.

The Downing Street Premium Yield Mortgage Fund LP, which will be available in DealSquare, will focus on a diversified mix of commercial, office, industrial, and development land properties, Downing Street said.

“We are actively growing both the debt and equity sides of our business and require a platform which can provide us with access to new capital sources. DealSquare offers that access, while also providing our firm with additional market exposure,” said Marc Canale, partner and COO at Downing Street. “We’re excited to launch this campaign and look forward to welcoming new investors into our business.”

Each mortgage will have a loan-to-value of not more than 75%, and a maturity of not more than two years.

“With DSPYM, Downing Street aims to provide unitholders with consistent monthly distributions backed by first mortgages that are subject to rigorous and diligent underwriting,” according to the announcement.

Downing Street said that it has been providing investment channels into residential, office, commercial, land, and industrial real estate across the GTA and Southwestern Ontario since the company’s founding in 1986.

by Ephraim Vecina 15 Jul 2020

Toronto needs to double rental supply to meet future demand

A new report from RBC Economics focuses on the rental housing deficit which is set to intensify in the coming years, especially in Toronto and Vancouver.

The report says that supply of new rental homes will need to pick up pace to meet future demand; in Toronto the pace must double. In the meantime, lack of supply is leading to “uncomfortable highs” for rents – which means those hoping to save up to buy a home are squeezed even further while high home prices have “crushed some homeownership dreams.”

RBC says that big cities must increase rental supply to have any hope of tackling affordability issues.

It notes that there are some positive signs in some cities, such as Montreal and Vancouver where has new waves of supply underway; and in Calgary where there are elevated rental vacancies.

But in Toronto, the report says supply will not come close to demand in the coming years and calls for specific targets and incentives to address the issue.

Deficit needs action
RBC Economics’ estimates of the supply needed to balance out supply and demand in the major markets as of late 2018 are: a deficit of 9,100 rental units in Toronto, Montreal had a 6,800-unit deficit and Vancouver 3,800 units.  Calgary carried a small surplus of 300 units.

This will be exacerbated by the estimated increase in renter-households of 22,000 in Toronto and 9,400 in Vancouver over the medium term, with Montreal averaging 8,200 per year on average.

The report estimates that Toronto will need 28,600 new rental units on average over a two year timeframe with 11,600 in Montreal, 11,300 in Vancouver and 4,150 in Calgary.

Are you looking to invest in property? If you like, we can get one of our mortgage experts to tell you exactly how much you can afford to borrow, which is the best mortgage for you or how much they could save you right now if you have an existing mortgage.

By Steve Randall |  last updated on the 26 Sep 2019

 

Demand for high-quality apartment buildings in downtown Edmonton helps fuel record investment quarter

Investment in Edmonton’s multi-family residential rental and industrial market helped fuel a record-breaking quarter in 2018 as the province continues to claw its way out of recession.

According to data released by CBRE Limited, Edmonton had its best quarter ever in Q2 this year, recording $1.49 billion in commercial real estate investments, representing a 51 per cent increase from the previous quarterly record of $994 million set in the fourth quarter of 2016. This brings Edmonton’s first half investment total to $2.07 billion, which is an all-time high for a half-year period and up from the previous record of $1.7 billion set in the second half of 2016.

Dave Young, executive vice-president with CBRE Limited, said Friday the growth in investment in the multi-family market is being spurred on by consumers looking for high quality apartment buildings, especially in the downtown core.

“We’re starting to see a transition from old to new,” said Young. “If you look at the inventory of apartment buildings, a lot of that was built from the mid-1950s to maybe the early-1980s, so you have a lot of older stock out there and it’s not giving what tenants are demanding.”

Tenants are looking for newer amenities that older apartment buildings don’t have, such as en suite laundry, and developers are beginning to take advantage of that demand.

Ice District has helped to fuel the demand within the downtown core, said Young, but it’s also about a shift in mindset.

“It’s urbanization, it’s densification. In terms of transportation patterns, in terms of traffic and in terms of transit, everything is focused on an urban lifestyle and we’re finally getting to see that,” said Young, citing The Hendrix apartment building, 9733 111 St., as an example.

“Ice District, for sure, has had an impact on our downtown core for the positive, but you also look at 104 Street from basically 100 Avenue all the way to 104 Avenue, there’s downtown urban living there that wasn’t there when I got into this business in 1990.”

There is still some demand for development around the Anthony Henday, Young says, but it’s not as active as downtown.

Out with the old

The demand for higher quality buildings is also being felt in industrial markets.

Tenants are really demanding more functional space and are being more strategic where they invest, said Young. Vacancy rates remain healthy, but the majority of future vacancies will be in older industrial buildings that just aren’t as adaptive.

“It’s kind of like the old apartment buildings where you see tenants getting sucked out into the new ones, the same thing is happening in the industrial buildings,” said Young. “The days of a 19-foot, distribution building just off 142 Street and the Yellowhead, they’re gone.”

trobb@postmedia.com

@TrevorRobb_